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Health Department

Lisa Gulla, Health Officer
(973) 593-3079
(973) 593-3072
Madison Civic Center
28 Walnut Street
Madison, NJ 07940 (map)

West Nile Virus

Mosquitoes and West Nile Virus on the Rise Nationwide

 

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, there have been more cases of West Nile Virus so far this year than any other year. The mild winter and wet spring have led to an early emergence of mosquitoes. Typically August and September are the prime months for mosquito breeding associated with West Nile virus. This year cases were reported as early as June and July.

 Symptoms of West Nile virus:

People typically develop West Nile symptoms between three and 14 days after being bitten by an infected mosquito.  Most people bitten will not develop symptoms but about 20% may develop fever, headache and body aches, nausea, vomiting, and sometimes swollen glands or a skin rash on the stomach, back and chest. One in 150 can develop severe, potentially fatal illness as seen in Dallas, Texas.

 Precautions:

Minimize the risk of disease by limiting your exposure to mosquitoes and by reducing the number of mosquitoes in your environment.

  • Stay inside at dawn and dusk, the times when mosquitoes are most active.
  • Wear long sleeves and long pants or Permethrin-treated clothing.
  • Use EPA-approved insect repellent like DEET, Picaridin, oil of eucalyptus.
  • Spray the repellent on your clothes not on your skin.
  • Get rid of mosquito breeding sites by emptying standing water from flower   pots, buckets and barrels.
  • Change the water in pet dishes and replace the water in birdbaths weekly.
  • Drill holes in tire swings so water drains out.
  • Keep children’s wading pools empty and on their sides when not being used.
  • Make sure screens on doors and windows are in good repair.

The Madison Health Department is working with the Morris County Mosquito Commission to monitor suspect areas.

Also see:

Morris County Mosquito Commission
CDC page on West Nile Virus
CDC page on mosquito prevention